• National Strike Strikes Again

    By on May 15, 2014

    “Excuse us for the inconveniences, we are struggling to guarantee our food sovereignty. Strike for progress. CISCA [Catatumbo Committee for Social Integration]

    From April 28th to May 9th, 2014, 3,000 farmers and miners from the Southern Bolivar, Catatumbo, and Cesar regions mobilized near the small town of Norean (three hours north of Barrancabermeja) along with thousands across the country as part of the National Strike, to pressure the national government to negotiate with their leaders in Bogota.   This is the second such mobilization in less than a year, after the government failed to fulfill the agreements that ended the first one.

  • Militarisation serving extraction

    By on April 23, 2014
    The Colombian armed forces, with 281,400 military personnel, are the second largest army in all of Latin America, surpassed only by Brazil. Added to that are the 159,000 members of the National Police, a militarised police force that reports to the Ministry of Defence. In Colombia there are 6.2 soldiers per one thousand inhabitants, a ratio almost four times that of Brazil.

    The surge in extractive mining and energy activities in Colombia over the last few years has come accompanied by the massive militarisation of the zones where the mining and energy sectors operate. The Colombian government has in recent years created what are known as Energy, Mining and Transport Battalions.

  • The People’s Land Summit, March’s March, and an Ultimatum

    By on April 11, 2014
    CAHUCOPANA, a grass-roots campesino organization that formed to defend the land and human rights of the campesinos in north-east Antioquia, has learnt that sometimes you have to leave your home to defend it. CAHUCOPANA asked the CPT Colombian team to accompany a caravan of dozens of buses from the department of Antioquia to join about 30 thousand demonstrators in a march in Colombia’s capital, Bogotá, on the 17th of March of this year.

    The march was planned to end and compliment the People’s Land Summit, also held in Bogotá. The Summit itself, in which CAHUCOPANA also participated, was in response to the national government’s failure to live up to the commitments it had made as part of negotiations to end a nation-wide general strike in August of 2013.

  • Dialogues over Strike Statement Start Off on the Right Foot in Segovia, Antioquia

    By on August 23, 2013

    Yesterday, August 22nd, the first peace march took place in the town of Segovia. It began at the...

  • Roundtable for Negotiation Begins Today in Medellín

    By on August 23, 2013
    We, the small farmers, miners, and indigenous people from the towns of Segovia and Remedios, declare to all local inhabitants that the claims and demands that were included in the recently-released statement constitute the people’s historical rights. These claims seek to defend all the rights of the people who live in this area, who have made great contributions to the country’s economy and development.

    Our struggle in this huge mobilization of thousands of farmers, miners, and indigenous people is intended to call the attention of the national government, so that they might pay attention to our requests, which have been fair and for the well-being of the entire region.

  • Stones and Precious Metals

    By on August 22, 2013
    On Sunday, August 18th, young men and women from the rural communities of the Segovia and Remedios municipalities of in the department of Antioquia took to the streets armed with frustration, courage, adrenaline, and, yes, sticks and stones. They went out to the streets of Segovia to express their frustration at a system that has abandoned them to live in conditions that no human should be asked to endure.

    This action is part of a larger national protest. All over Colombia small farmers, miners, the indigenous, truckers, teachers, healthcare workers, coffee and cacao growers and other agricultural sectors have joined together to cry out that they are tired of the conditions they have been asked – by the Colombian government – to endure in order to join the wider world economy.

  • Other Nations deserve to live Strong and Free as well

    By on July 17, 2013
    On Sunday, August 18th, young men and women from the rural communities of the Segovia and Remedios municipalities of in the department of Antioquia took to the streets armed with frustration, courage, adrenaline, and, yes, sticks and stones. They went out to the streets of Segovia to express their frustration at a system that has abandoned them to live in conditions that no human should be asked to endure.

    This action is part of a larger national protest. All over Colombia small farmers, miners, the indigenous, truckers, teachers, healthcare workers, coffee and cacao growers and other agricultural sectors have joined together to cry out that they are tired of the conditions they have been asked – by the Colombian government – to endure in order to join the wider world economy.